Hillsdale & Statesmanship

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The study of statesmanship is central to the teaching mission of Hillsdale College, and the classics teach that the art can be best understood by studying those who have a reputation for it.

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Why Churchill?

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Churchill’s career presents an unsurpassed opportunity for the study of statesmanship, for he faced the great crises of the twentieth century and left behind one of the richest records of human undertaking.

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Churchill & Hillsdale

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Hillsdale College will promote a proper account of this record by combining the College’s educational expertise with its work both as publisher of Churchill’s Official Biography and as the repository of the Martin Gilbert papers.

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Support the Churchill Project

for the Study of Statesmanship

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Your generous support will build an endowment to fund national conferences, student scholarships, a faculty chair, and the completion and publication of The Official Biography of Winston Churchill.

Recent Articles

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From the Cover of Pim and Churchill's Map Room, by John Potter
24
Jul
“Pim and Churchill’s Map Room” – by John Potter

This fine little book distills Captain Pim’s memoirs, which are lodged in the Public Records Office of Northern Ireland in Belfast. Expertly edited by John Potter, it offers charming vignettes of what it was like to work for Churchill, as Pim saw him on an almost daily basis and travelled with him to almost all the wartime conferences.

Posted in: Books,
a_midsummer_night's_dream
18
Jul
Churchill and Shakespeare

In his book Churchill’s Literary Allusions, Darrell Holley writes: “There is no English author whom Churchill alludes to as often as to William Shakespeare. Both by formal quotations, some quite lengthy, and by well-known phrases almost hidden in his text, Churchill makes allusion to many of Shakespeare’s plays.”

Posted in: Q & A,
todman 2
18
Jul
“Britain’s War: Into Battle 1937-1941” – by Daniel Todman

Like all syntheses, Todman’s has weaknesses, but in general his book has many countervailing strengths: clarity in exposition and a fine touch when dealing with the oft-scanted civilian and production side of the story.

Posted in: Books,