Hillsdale & Statesmanship

divider-white

The study of statesmanship is central to the teaching mission of Hillsdale College, and the classics teach that the art can be best understood by studying those who have a reputation for it.

READ MORE >

 

Why Churchill?

divider-white

Churchill’s career presents an unsurpassed opportunity for the study of statesmanship, for he faced the great crises of the twentieth century and left behind one of the richest records of human undertaking.

READ MORE >

 

Churchill & Hillsdale

divider-white

Hillsdale College will promote a proper account of this record by combining the College’s educational expertise with its work both as publisher of Churchill’s Official Biography and as the repository of the Martin Gilbert papers.

READ MORE >

 

Support the Churchill Project

for the Study of Statesmanship

divider-blue

Your generous support will build an endowment to fund national conferences, student scholarships, a faculty chair, and the completion and publication of The Official Biography of Winston Churchill.

Recent Articles

divider-red

07
Aug
Nolan’s Dunkirk: “Don’t Let’s Be Beastly to the Germans”

Dunkirk, produced by Christopher Nolan, sets out to portray the 1940 rescue of the Allied armies from the clutches of Hitler’s Wehrmacht in terms of courage, heroism, survival, and a few examples of cowardice. In that he succeeds admirably. In terms of context—in conveying an understanding of what Dunkirk was about—he fails utterly.

Posted in: Explore,
17
May
Lessons in Statesmanship: Exchanging Classified Information in Wartime

It is not unprecedented for a head of state of a democratic nation to give classified information in wartime to the head of a despotism, including the Russian or the Soviet government. On April 3, 1941, Winston Churchill sent Joseph Stalin a message containing classified information for the purpose of informing him of German troop movements and military intentions.

Posted in: Explore,
02
May
Fake News from the Huffington Post

The Huffington Post presented five reasons why Churchill should not be featured on Britain’s five pound note. Four of these are common—but debunked—criticisms, and although the fifth is new, it holds up no better than the other four.

Posted in: Truths and Heresies,