Hillsdale & Statesmanship

divider-white

The study of statesmanship is central to the teaching mission of Hillsdale College, and the classics teach that the art can be best understood by studying those who have a reputation for it.

READ MORE >

 

Why Churchill?

divider-white

Churchill’s career presents an unsurpassed opportunity for the study of statesmanship, for he faced the great crises of the twentieth century and left behind one of the richest records of human undertaking.

READ MORE >

 

Churchill & Hillsdale

divider-white

Hillsdale College will promote a proper account of this record by combining the College’s educational expertise with its work both as publisher of Churchill’s Official Biography and as the repository of the Martin Gilbert papers.

READ MORE >

 

Support the Churchill Project

for the Study of Statesmanship

divider-blue

Your generous support will build an endowment to fund national conferences, student scholarships, a faculty chair, and the completion and publication of The Official Biography of Winston Churchill.

Recent Articles

divider-red

statecraft
18
Jan
“Winston Churchill: Politics, Strategy and Statecraft”

The book provides “a short, accessible and analytical introduction to key themes in Churchill’s life [that] reflect cutting edge scholarship.” But several books do that better […]. This book does not offer much that is new, and lacks editorial unity. Some authors cover the same ground, variously agreeing or contending, with no cross-references or attempts to contrast their opinions.

Posted in: Books,
Common
18
Jan
Churchill and Common Folk: A Case of Misconception

Undoubtedly the ​constituency work of MPs has changed since Churchill’s time​. Communications and awareness are vastly enhanced nowadays. But if the honorable Member is suggesting ​that Churchill was too much an aristocrat to concern himself with ​common ​people, she ​needs to ​further her education.

Posted in: Truths and Heresies,
Korda
08
Jan
Korda on Britain in 1940

Against the background of the retreat and escape of the British and French Armies, Korda poses the trial of strength between Halifax and Churchill. His not entirely novel thesis is that Churchill’s position of no truck with Hitler would have been untenable had the Dunkirk evacuation not been seen as a success in Britain. Like Churchill, Korda does not call it a success. But he offers Montgomery’s words to describe Britain’s mood. Escapees wore “a coloured embroidered patch on their sleeve with the title ‘Dunkirk.’ They thought they were heroes, and the civilian public thought so. It was not understood that the British Army had suffered a crushing defeat.”

Posted in: Books,